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    Antonin Fourneau’s Water Light Grafitti

    Graffiti is everywhere in cities, from the subways to outside your window. However, as lovely or annoying as that graffiti may be, it is probably not interactive. This is where Antonin Fourneau‘s latest “graffiti” project seems almost revolutionary. The artist working in residence with Digitalarti Artlab made various prototypes for an interactive wall made of LED lights that would light up in the contact of water.

    A video posted from Digitalarti Artlab shows Fourneau in the process of making the wall, as he welds wires and lights together to create a huge black wall with lights inserted onto it. Graffiti is meant to be enjoyed in a public space, and Fourneau’s “Water Light Grafitti” was no exception, as the artist placed his wall in Poitiers, France, for four days. Throughout its public debut, children and adults alike sprayed the wall with water forming shapes, names, words and even reproducing the appearance of a human.

    The French artist known for his mix of technology and art is always finding new ways to make his works interactive, and “Water Light Grafitti” is successful at breaking the gap between viewer, artist and artwork.

    By Laura Pulgarin 

    — 2 years ago with 1 note
    #grafitti  #antonin  #fourneau  #art  #water  #light 
    Old Friends #10 Ditch Plains, Montauk, NY | Joni Sternbach

    Old Friends #10 Ditch Plains, Montauk, NY | Joni Sternbach

    — 2 years ago with 18 notes
    #JONI STERNBACH  #old friends  #surf  #surfing  #vintage 
    Pablo Picasso & Francoise Gilot, Golfe-Juan, France, August 1948, 1948 | Robert Capa

    Pablo Picasso & Francoise Gilot, Golfe-Juan, France, August 1948, 1948 | Robert Capa

    — 2 years ago with 4 notes
    #pablo  #picasso  #robert  #capa  #francoise  #gilot  #france  #photography 
    How Collecting Was Born


    Johann Georg HainzCabinets of Curiosities, ca. 1666, Oil on Canvas (Collection of  the Hamburger Kunsthalle)

    It all started with a routine gene “clean-up” of the Group of Objects gene. Clean-ups are one of the many ways we maintain the integrity and accuracy of The Art Genome Project. They entail looking at every artist and artwork with a value for a particular gene, and ensuring that the application is correct, i.e. that the artist or artwork presented has a connection to the gene and its definition. Clean-ups often lead to ideas for new genes, since what does not fit correctly in one gene might be better explained through another.

    Group of Objects had originally been conceived as a gene for capturing two-dimensional depictions of multiple objects whose arrangement did not conform to compositional strategies of traditional still lifes. Yet it turned out that there were a number of three-dimensional works with this gene applied that were not depictions of groups of objects, but real-life groups of objects themselves, such as this diorama by Gianfranco Baruchello. In fact there were so many instances of this that the human error of our genomers alone could not account for it; instead it indicated that there was a significant need to capture such works via some yet-to-be-identified category. 

    This was now a whole other problem. Our plan of attack was to first identify the many different ways to describe different configurations of physical objects. We sifted through lots of related genes, such as Commodity (currently being re-worked), TypologiesAssemblage, and Use of Everyday Objects, and ended up proposing three new genes along with working definitions. They were were as follows:


    Collections of Objects:
    What Umberto Eco has called “poetic visual lists.” In their organization, they are indebted to the Baroque cabinet of curiosities, and their organization is specifically personal and oftentimes whimsical. Example: Fos, A Collection of Dark to Light Greens, 2008. 

    The Archive: 
    Refers to works that explore the configurations of knowledge as embodied by the archive, which is defined as a collection of historical documents or objects and/or the place where such records are stored, oftentimes as a means of critiquing or destabilizing the supposed objectivity, authenticity and authority of the archive. Significant examples: Dieter Roth, Flat Garbage, 1975-6 (a series of file cabinets housing 1160 files of refuse) or the Atlas Group Archive.

    Accumulations:
    A concept first proposed by Karl Marx in the 19th century as a behavior endemic to capitalist production. As a process, it involves amassing or gathering objects or documents as part of a continual, additive process, often to convey a sense of excess, cornucopia, sheer volume, or even infinity. A recent example: Dash Snow and Dan Colen, Nest, 2007, installation at Deitch Projects.

    These ideas were all interesting, and, arguably, very relevant to contemporary practice. Yet “interesting” is not a sufficient criterion for inclusion in The Art Genome. Instead, we always consider the following:

    1. A gene needs to be concrete enough for its definition and application to be clear to both our users and genomers. 
    2. A gene has to be broadly applicable so that we can use it to make connections amongst different artists or artworks. If only two artworks on the site have the gene “The Archive,” it may say a lot about their work, but it doesn’t relate them to anything else. 
    3. A gene has to be grounded in reality, i.e. what artists are actually doing. Here we have to guard against considering contemporary theoretical frameworks as genes without making sure they relate to specific works of art. 
    4. It should try to capture one aspect of artistic production at once. Otherwise, there should be more than one gene.
    5. It should not overlap too much with existing genes.

    Accordingly we made the following decisions:

    1. Collections of Objects, though interesting, did not satisfy the 1st, 3rd, or 4th criteria above. It combined both a concept, “Collecting,” with a definition we imposed on the concept—collecting solely as the “personal” cabinet of curiosities.
    2. Though The Archive was a more concrete idea, we found it did not satisfy the second criteria; there were not that many works to which this would have applied. So we decided not to introduce this to the site, but to return to it at a later date should the need arise.
    3. Accumulations was, like The Archive, deemed too rare. It was also too theoretical and arguably did not fulfill the 3rd and 4th criteria. Also, some artists produce works that one could describe as an accumulation of things, but in fact have little to do with the process of accumulating or the concept of excess. In other words, as conceived, this gene combined a physical property of objects (the accumulation) with a concept (the pathology of accumulating), and thus was doing double duty. We decided to table this for the time being.

    So on one hand, we talked ourselves out of all of our “new” genes. On the other hand, in the process of rejecting these genes, we realized one thing these proposed genes shared was an interest in collecting. Collections of Objects were about personal collections ofnaturalia and artificialiaThe Archive was about an official and rational collection of documents, and Accumulations focused on the seemingly unchecked collecting of mundane things.

    Collecting as a concept gene was also inclusive enough to fulfill the 2nd criterion, it also captured one concept at a time, it was relevant and concrete, and it did not overlap with other genes. It additionally allowed us to avoid making speculative judgments regarding artistic intent.

    That is how Collecting was born.

    As implemented, Collecting now encompasses both depictions of and critical approaches to myriad types and spaces of collecting, from museums, libraries, and archives to collections of scientific specimens. It includes artworks like Marcel Duchamp’s seminalBoîte en Valise—a selection of miniature renditions of the artist’s own works presented in a box. It also includes images of collections, such as this early photograph by William Henry Fox Talbot,The Articles of Porcelain, 1844, and artworks like these five plaster casts of the artist Terence Koh’s head. Housed in glass vitrines, their mouths open as if they are moaning. I like to think of Koh’s work as a macabre cabinet of curiosities that makes trophies of the beheaded artist. The sound of his voice is muffled by the vitrine. It functions as an apt reminder to leave the work of art the space to speak, even if it does get put into a box. 

    -Jessica Backus, Researcher on The Art Genome Project

    — 2 years ago
    #art  #collecting  #art genome project 
    A Guide to SoWa Open Market

    When I say “SoWa,” there are two types of responses.

    One group says, “Huh? So whaaat?”

    Another group says, “OMG, what’s your favorite food tuck?”

    I used to be in the former group, but now that I’m in the latter, I would like to educate those in the former on the greatness that isSoWa Open Market.

    Let’s start with the name. SoWa stands for South of Washington, referring to the area in the South End that is, well, south of Washington Street. I guess Boston is trying to be like New York’s SoHo. Valid attempt. According to Wikipedia, the area spans “east to west, from Mass. Ave to East Berkeley Street and north to south, from Washington Street to Albany Street, centered on the SoWa Building, at 450 Harrison Avenue.”

    The market actually consists of three parts. First is the farmers’ marketwhich features much more than fresh produce. Take a walk through this side of the market and you’ll find everything from fresh herbs to bread bakeries, gluten-free marshmallows, gourmet potato chipsbeef jerkycoffee and more. The vendors are proud of their work, which, for you, means free samples! The vendors love sharing their experiences, and often have some cool background stories to share, so while chowing down on their goods, be sure to ask questions; I guarantee you’ll learn something.

    Next, venture over to the food trucks. On any given Sunday, there are about 10 mobile eateries parked at SoWa, dishing out lobster rolls, fried cauliflower, ice cream sandwiches, grilled cheese and more. Their enthusiasm is contagious, especially considering how hot it must get inside those little trucks with ovens running at full steam. They always take your orders with a smile on their face, and you know they love what they do.

    The food trucks surround the artisan booths, featuring a range of local artists and crafters. These talented folks bring you everything from jewelry to stuffed animals, art work to t-shirts. Prices vary, so you can buy yo’ mama a nice necklace for her birthday or grab your roomie a $15 t-shirt with a dinosaur on it just for kicks. There’s even a food truck for clothes.

    Need to cool off? Head inside to the Vintage Market. While it doesn’t have AC, there are giant fans stationed around the facility that’ll keep you breezy as you scour through stacks of old maps and rummage through clothing that your grandmother probably wore. A word to the wise: The vendors are willing to bargain, especially if you buy more than one item from them, so get your game face on to bring those prices down. If you have a keen eye, you can walk away with some pretty neat artwork for your pad.

    SoWa Open Market runs every Sunday from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. through October 28. If you haven’t been yet, I suggest making your way there this weekend. And I’ll likely be there chowing down on some grilled cheese.

    via http://bostinno.com/2012/08/03/a-guide-to-sowa-open-market
    /

    — 2 years ago
    #uberkase  #iphone 5  #cases  #iphone cases  #vintage  #south end  #boston  #vintage market  #sowa  #open  #market 
    EVOLUTION OF THE NEW YORK SKYLINE, 1876-2013

    EVOLUTION OF THE NEW YORK SKYLINE, 1876-2013

    — 2 years ago with 11 notes
    #nyc  #New York City  #skyline  #evolution  #uberkase  #iphone 5  #iphone case 
    Europe After the Rain - Max Ernst
Closely associated with Dada and Surrealism, Max Ernst made paintings, sculptures, and prints depicting fantastic, nightmarish images that often made reference to anxieties originating in childhood. Ernst demonstrated a profound interest in Freudian psychoanalysis, which is apparent in his exploration of Automatism and his invention of the Frottage technique. The artist’s psychoanalytic leanings are evident in his iconic 1923 work Pietà, or Revolution by Night, in which Ernst substitutes the image of Mary cradling the body of Christ with a depiction of the artist himself held by his father. Much of the artist’s work defied societal norms, Christian morality, and the aesthetic standards of Western academic art.

    Europe After the Rain - Max Ernst

    Closely associated with Dada and Surrealism, Max Ernst made paintings, sculptures, and prints depicting fantastic, nightmarish images that often made reference to anxieties originating in childhood. Ernst demonstrated a profound interest in Freudian psychoanalysis, which is apparent in his exploration of Automatism and his invention of the Frottage technique. The artist’s psychoanalytic leanings are evident in his iconic 1923 work Pietà, or Revolution by Night, in which Ernst substitutes the image of Mary cradling the body of Christ with a depiction of the artist himself held by his father. Much of the artist’s work defied societal norms, Christian morality, and the aesthetic standards of Western academic art.

    — 2 years ago with 17 notes
    #max  #earnst  #europe after the rain  #europe  #after  #the rain  #ernst  #dada  #surrealism  #paintings  #freud  #uberkase  #uber  #kase  #iphone 
    The Persistence of Memory (1931) 
Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

    The Persistence of Memory (1931) 

    Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

    — 2 years ago with 12 notes
    #salvador  #dali  #salvador dali  #surrealism  #art  #oil  #on  #canvas  #the  #persistence  #of  #memory  #iphone  #case  #uberkase  #uber  #kase  #ubercase 
    App of the Week!

    Reeder 3: Reading at its best

    The App Store celebrated its one billionth app download in 2009, a time when Retina displays were a mere dream and multitasking required two iPhones. Reeder made its debut after the 2009 milestone and was one of the first apps to bring style to iOS RSS readers. In the three years since this milestone, downloads exceeded the 25 billion mark, and Apple finally pushed past the mark of platform parity. Just like the savvy developers at Apple, Rizzi continued to push innovative designs, and the app grew along with the operating system that held it.

    Reeder 2 featured major design and performance improvements, and it quickly became a gold standard as well as a dock companion. Rizzi dropped several hints about Reeder 3 over the last few months, but none of these juicy bits prepared users for the dramatically different experience provided by the newest update. Reeder’s new 3D animations and improved picture handling brought quick praise, but critics were just as quick to critique the app on its extensive push of the Readability service.

    Does Reeder 3 improve upon its predecessor, or has the update tarnished this app’s excellent reputation?

    Users can access accounts individually or use the universal unread list.

    Reeder’s cutting-edge design has always been a key selling point, and the latest release of the app certainly lives up to the hefty expectations placed upon it. The new icon is representative of Rizzi’s choice to remove unnecessary design bulk, but it still oozes the Reeder style. In the same fashion, Reeder ditches many of the heavy menu bars in favor of light tabs that give the illusion of having more space. This is especially relevant in the article view, where the dark titlebars have been done away with altogether. Everything about Reeder is simplified, and the app even axes little distractions such as the status bar takeover during feed refreshes.

    Subtle feedback is key in Reeder. The thicker border shows that there is more content offscreen. Notice how it fades at the end of the article.

    Reeder 3.0 supports two additional services, Fever and Readability, and the app does an excellent job of incorporating these services into its signature design. Each of the service feeds is separated into starred, unread and all articles, just like articles in Google Reader. This consistent experience makes it easy to switch between services, and Reeder takes it one step further by combining all of them into one unread list. Of course, there are unread lists for each individual service, but the universal list is perfect for someone who simply wants to read.

    Google Reader

    Reeder 3.0 is forward thinking with its inclusion of Readability and Fever, but it certainly doesn’t leave Google Reader behind. The update brings a major addition to the Google Reader feature set, subscription management. Users can add a feed url by tapping the plus button in the Google Reader list view. The app also offers individual feed management.

    Fever

    Reeder is the second iPhone application to support Shaun Inman’s Fever, a self-hosted alternative to Google Reader. The first iPhone app to tackle Fever, Sunstroke, takes inspiration from Fever’s fiery theme, but Reeder strips away most of the flames and brings Fever’s presentation inline with Reeder’s subdued design.

    The Fever layout is very similar to that of Google Reader, except that users can also access the Hot list.

    The Hot list is one of the key differences between Google Reader and Fever, and Reeder brings the Hot list along but drops the temperature headings present in the web experience. The Hot list combines articles that reference or link to the same event into one story module. Fever users can glance over similar articles, choose which ones they want to read and ditch the rest.

    Swipe a Hot list story to the right to mark all of the enclosed articles as read.

    Reeder can cache images for unread and/or starred items for each account, based on user preference.

    One of the largest caveats with Fever is that the service doesn’t refresh automatically. Users must either manually trigger a server refresh or create a cron job to schedule periodic refreshes. Reeder can trigger a refresh within the application, but it must also sync with the server once the refresh is complete. Refresh speeds are based on the web host, and it’s certainly not as fast as syncing with Google Reader. Fortunately, Reeder intelligently differentiates between sync and server refresh in the Fever settings, so users can control each setting individually. Users can still rely on cron to refresh Fever automatically, which makes the syncing experience with Reeder much faster.

    Readability

    Readability’s official app is an excellent way to keep up with saved articles, but there’s little reason to keep the separate app now that Reeder has full Readability support. Users can save Fever or Google Reader articles to Readability and review their articles all within Reeder’s walls. Reeder’s settings acknowledge that RSS readers and read-later services are used in fundamentally different ways. App settings can be customized for each service, so Readability fans can set the “Mark Article as Read” to the manual mode, so articles remain in the unread list as long as the reader desires.

    Readability looks just like the other services in Reeder, but the app’s extensive settings make for a customized experience.

    Gestures

    Clever gestures are an integral part of the Reeder experience, and the newest release improves the classics and makes some notable additions. Users can still individually customize the left and right swipes to mark articles as read/unread or send an article to their favorite read-later service, but the animations are greatly improved. The traditional pull to flip arrow for articles has been replaced with a 3D accordion animation. This same animation is also used in a new gesture, where users can mark all articles above or below an article in a feed as read by two-finger swiping up or down on an article in the feed list. General article navigation is as speedy as ever, with the swipe back gesture that takes users from an article back to the feed list. The only thing missing here is the ability to swipe back from the web view of an article.

    Reeder’s animations are slick and provide useful feedback for gestures.

    Pinch the screen to activate the Readability mobilizer in the article view.

    Share

    Reeder 3 brings a completely revamped sharing menu, with additional services and a better-looking layout. The sharing options are fairly standard for Google Reader, but Fever users will definitely appreciate the built in options that don’t require a custom url. There are 11 sharing options to choose from, including specialties such as QUOTE.fm and Buffer. Additional sharing options are nice, but Reeder’s improved image handling is something special. Tap a feed image to reveal the action menu. Users can share an image, view it fullscreen, or save it to the camera roll.

    Users can share both articles and images with the enhanced sharing menu.

    Conclusion

    AppStorm readers understand the thrill of discovering new apps, and there’s always new eye candy in the app store; but, it’s the apps that continuously improve that make the iPhone worth using. These tried-and-true applications keep us coming back to our phones and show developers that it’s possible to create a longstanding success in an environment that’s full of flashes in the pan.

    Last year Shaun Takenouchi wrote, “Overall, Reeder is hands down, one of the best Google Reader apps out there for the iPhone.” Reeder is still one of the best, if not the best Google Reader app for the iPhone, but leave it to developer Silvio Rizzi to add two new services to the list. Rizzi doesn’t merely add support for these services as an afterthought, he includes the appropriate flourishes and features to make Reeder the only app that you’ll ever need to use them. Reeder 3’s performance is superb and the interface changes remove the heft of fading design trends. This must-purchase application has improved in every way, and the inclusion of additional services underlines the continued commitment of a truly excellent developer.

    via AppStorm

    — 2 years ago with 2 notes
    #reeder  #iphone  #app  #ios  #brilliant  #reading  #apple  #iphone 4  #iphone 5  #iphone 4s 
    "10 Sports Figures" by Andy Warhol
Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell’s Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.
© 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    "10 Sports Figures" by Andy Warhol

    Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell’s Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard PrinceTakashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

    © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    — 2 years ago with 1 note
    #andy warhol  #andy  #warhol  #polaroid  #sports  #icons  #uberkase  #uber  #case  #iphone  #iphone 5  #citykase 
    Carne tuya me parece,rojo lirio, junco fresco.Morena de luna llena.¿Qué quieres de mi deseo?GARCIA LORCA
-Salvador Dalí

    Carne tuya me parece,
    rojo lirio, junco fresco.
    Morena de luna llena.
    ¿Qué quieres de mi deseo?
    GARCIA LORCA

    -Salvador Dalí

    — 2 years ago with 1 note
    #salvador dali  #dali  #painting  #woman  #nude  #uberkase  #uber  #kase  #iphone  #case  #ar  #design  #art  #tech 
    GoSquared Analyzes the London 2012 Games
The 2012 Summer Olympic Games, officially the Games of the XXX Olympiad, are all set to begin in London tomorrow. There’s been plenty of excitement surrounding it in the air lately and a lot of iOS apps have come out both for iOS and Android platforms, including these official ones. GoSquared, one of the most popular real-time web analytics apps and based in the UK, decided to celebrate the London 2012 Games by putting together this gorgeous single page website — Analyzing London 2012.
The website, put together by the talented team at GoSquared, lays out interesting numbers and trivia about the event in a beautiful way. The site makes excellent use of Parallax scrolling, to display the content. There’s plenty of examples of CSS3 animations and transitions in the site and the pixels and colors as handled fantastically. I really like little touches like Usain Bolt running across the screen, the background color changing from gold to silver for that trivia and the way the arrows for the stadium height expand as you scroll further.
Since GoSquared is a web analytics product, the bottom of the page has a world map that tells you how many people are currently viewing the web page and from which part of the world. At the very bottom, the page shows you how long it took you to scroll though the page and compares it to Usain Bolt’s speed. Brilliant.
This is my favorite kind of website and we’ve featured similar sites in the past. It’s one of those sites where I can’t help but mention, “Scroll baby, scroll”. Go ahead and check it out, what’re you waiting for?
Full Disclosure: GoSquared is a Beautiful Pixels partner and we use the service to monitor the traffic on our site.

    GoSquared Analyzes the London 2012 Games

    The 2012 Summer Olympic Games, officially the Games of the XXX Olympiad, are all set to begin in London tomorrow. There’s been plenty of excitement surrounding it in the air lately and a lot of iOS apps have come out both for iOS and Android platforms, including these official ones. GoSquared, one of the most popular real-time web analytics apps and based in the UK, decided to celebrate the London 2012 Games by putting together this gorgeous single page website — Analyzing London 2012.

    The website, put together by the talented team at GoSquared, lays out interesting numbers and trivia about the event in a beautiful way. The site makes excellent use of Parallax scrolling, to display the content. There’s plenty of examples of CSS3 animations and transitions in the site and the pixels and colors as handled fantastically. I really like little touches like Usain Bolt running across the screen, the background color changing from gold to silver for that trivia and the way the arrows for the stadium height expand as you scroll further.

    Since GoSquared is a web analytics product, the bottom of the page has a world map that tells you how many people are currently viewing the web page and from which part of the world. At the very bottom, the page shows you how long it took you to scroll though the page and compares it to Usain Bolt’s speed. Brilliant.

    This is my favorite kind of website and we’ve featured similar sites in the past. It’s one of those sites where I can’t help but mention, “Scroll baby, scroll”. Go ahead and check it out, what’re you waiting for?

    Full Disclosure: GoSquared is a Beautiful Pixels partner and we use the service to monitor the traffic on our site.

    — 2 years ago
    #london  #2012  #olympic  #games  #gosquared  #summer olympic games  #ios  #android  #uk  #real-time  #gorgeous  #single  #page  #website  #css3  #uberkase  #uber  #kase  #iphone  #case 
    Audrey Hepburn on the cover of Harper’s Bazaar, April 1956. Photo by Richard Avedon.

    Audrey Hepburn on the cover of Harper’s Bazaar, April 1956. Photo by Richard Avedon.

    — 2 years ago with 7 notes
    #audrey  #hepburn  #harper's  #bazaar  #april  #1956  #richard  #avedon  #fashion  #vintage  #iphone  #uberkase  #ubercase 
    App of the Week!

    http://www.protectedapp.com

    Have you ever been in a situation where your friends or family wanted to check out your phone, but you were reluctant to give it to them because you feared that they might view some of the photos you have stored on the device and don’t want others to see? Or may be you’re just not storing the photos on the device because a lot of people handle your phone, even though you wish you could? Yes, there may be various reasons why you’d want to keep some of your photos private. Unfortunately, iOS does not give you the option to password protect your albums.

    Protected will help you. Protected is a simple iPhone app that acts as a safe for your private photos. Designed by Lucie Karásková and developed by Pierre Abi-Aad, Protected lets you create multiple albums and add photos to them, which are then protected with a password that you can set. You can either import photos you already have on your phone or click a new one and have Protected save it directly. It also gives you the option to either add a dump of photos via iTunes, or export the ones already in the app.

    My favorite thing about the app is its icon featured in the masthead above. Though I’m not particularly fond of the flash, it looks great as an icon of a toy camera with photos stuffed in it. When you launch the app, there’s a login sheet that is pulled up from within the icon and this screen has some nice transitions as well. The app too has been well-designed and the bariol font used looks nice.

    However, I do have some quibbles about it. For starters, when viewing the individual photos in an album, the bar at the bottom and the glyphs look like they were done in a hurry and look out of place. There’re also a couple of grammatical errors, but the developer’s already working on an update to fix that. In spite of this, Protected is still a great little app to have at $0.99 on the App Store.

    via Beautiful Pixels

    (Source: facebook.com)

    — 2 years ago
    #apps  #app  #iphone  #ios  #protected  #minimal  #photos  #albums  #uberkase  #uber  #kase  #ubercase  #case